Hatteress

jarexz:

loveatitsfinest:

bestrooftalkever:

party-wok:

julierthanyou:

clambistro:

Ahh, it’s back

i have disproportionately strong feelings about this.

every time i say “nah i’m not gonna watch it again.” BUT I STILL DO EVERY TIME.

YEAUGH

the comments are painfully accurate. 

the freeze-frame makes it even more incredible

(Source: videohall, via hellscowbells)

Anonymous asks:

Towards the whole "pronouns hurt people's feelings" topic. Am I REALLY the only person on the planet that thinks people are becoming far to sensative? Nearly to the point that they shouldn't leave their little home bubbles in the case that a bird chirps next to them in a way that sounds like a mean word. Maybe, JUST MAYBE, we're becoming a little TOO coddling and people need to learn to deal with simplistic shit like words. And yes, I've been insulted and made fun of. I got over it. So can you.

thefrogman:

Supposedly invented by the Chinese, there is an ancient form of torture that is nothing more than cold, tiny drops falling upon a person’s forehead. 

On its own, a single drop is nothing. It falls upon the brow making a tiny splash. It doesn’t hurt. No real harm comes from it. 

In multitudes, the drops are still fairly harmless. Other than a damp forehead, there really is no cause for concern. 

The key to the torture is being restrained. You cannot move. You must feel each drop. You have lost all control over stopping these drops of water from splashing on your forehead. 

It still doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. But person after person, time and time again—would completely unravel psychologically. They all had a breaking point where each drop turned into a horror. Building and building until all sense of sanity was completely lost. 

"It was just a joke, quit being so sensitive."

"They used the wrong pronoun, big deal."

"So your parents don’t understand, it could be worse."

Day after day. Drop after drop. It builds up. A single instance on its own is no big deal. A few drops, not a problem. But when you are restrained, when you cannot escape the drops, when it is unending—these drops can be agony. 

People aren’t sensitive because they can’t take a joke. Because they can’t take being misgendered one time. Because they lack a thick skin. 

People are sensitive because the drops are unending and they have no escape from them. 

You are only seeing the tiny, harmless, single drop hitting these so-called “sensitive” people. You are failing to see the thousands of drops endured before that. You are failing to see the restraints that make them inescapable.

mykabering:

so i just met stephanie beatriz and chatted to her about the ladies on the show bc this is ALL I CARE ABOUT and then i mentioned headcanoning rosa as queer and she was like ‘yeah totally i think rosa goes and gets what she wants and isn’t bothered by things like gender’

i cried

(via polytropic-liar)

fannishtalk asks:

I know Sinyhale has already commented, but there's now a rumor going around that you were very upset/disappointed about Posey/MTV not mentioning the SC for the award/giving it to a random fan. I don't know if this is accurate and given your position making gifs for the official tumblr (which I hope they pay you for) maybe you can't comment publicly. But if you can comment/have the desire to do so, I just wanted to let you know. I'm spitting mad at MTV, but whatever, I don't expect much anymore.

qhuinn:

Dear lord, when did the Sterek Campaign become this big of a deal? It’s very overwhelming to see everyone talking about us, for better or worse, and I can’t help being completely baffled at the magnitude of the events.

I’m always torn between speaking freely and not wanting to make things worse. But I think there are some clarifications that must be made. So here we go.

Read More

Oh, Boy.

howlnatural:

His breathing is so loud it drowns out the thump of bass from the floor below.

Stiles can’t— It’s been fucking months. Months of So, Derek… we’re in the same lab group, huh? And: hey, if you’re interested, I’ve got a bunch of  resources on Schwartz’ field work I could go over with you, in my dorm room, where my roommate is definitely out of state for the weekend. Not to mention: soooo Derek I was thinking, uh I don’t really fully understand what Professor Fallon was getting at in the last seminar, think you could shed some light on it for me? Over coffee?

Derek Hale is the most brain-stewingly hot science nerd Stiles has laid eyes on in his entire nineteen years of existence. And he’s met a lot. A lot. Even Jenna Montgomery from space camp in eighth grade, who was the owner of the first boob Stiles ever touched has been eclipsed by Derek No You Can’t Try On My Glasses Hale. Derek I Stroke My Stubble When I’m Doing Complicated Calculations Hale disagrees with Stiles on pretty much every theoretical debate opened to the floor, develops a stutter when he’s astounded by someone’s perceived stupidity and remembers your pizza topping combination despite hearing it only once when ordering in for group study sessions. Stiles didn’t stand a chance.

Derek is also the most oblivious.

Did he mention months? Stiles has never been commended on his subtlety. His dad joked once that there would never come a time when he’d get the wrong birthday gift, since he all but published a coupon in the local paper for whatever it was. So Stiles knew it wasn’t something lacking on his end. However, Derek I Must Not Have Been This Hot In High School Hale had innocently rebuked every single one of Stiles’ come-ons with replies like yes I know I was there when they called out our group members and I have the internet and library access too, Stiles and Lydia said I could read her notes -you can have them after I guess.

Honestly.

So. Stiles had resorted to doing things the old fashioned way: keg party and Usher.

Hey, it worked.

Read More

bigangry:

vaganto:

According to Stop Patriarchy, Mark Ruffalo sent a speech to be read at an abortion rights rally this weekend in Mississippi in which he expressed his frustration with the state legislature’s ongoing attempts to close every last women’s health centers that offer abortion services.
The Clarion-Ledger reports that over 100 supporters gathered at the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, and listened to a personal account of Ruffalo’s about the issue of abortion rights, in which he mentioned his mother’s struggle to obtain an abortion when she was young:

I am a man. I could say this has nothing to do with me. Except I have two daughters and I have a mother who was forced to illegally have an abortion in her state where abortion was illegal when she was a very young woman. It cost $600 cash. It was a traumatizing thing for her. It was shameful and sleazy and demeaning. When I heard the story I was aghast by the lowliness of a society that would make a woman do that. I could not understand its lack of humanity; today is no different.

Ruffalo reportedly referenced the United States as it existed pre-Roe v. Wade as “relic of an America that was not free nor equal nor very kind”, saying that it “we have worked long and hard to leave behind” that time:

My own mother fought to make herself more than a possession; she lived her life as a mother who chose when she would have children, and a wife who could earn a living if she so chose. I want my daughters to enjoy that same choice. I don’t want to turn back the hands of time to when women shuttled across state lines in the thick of night to resolve an unwanted pregnancy, in a cheap hotel room just south of the state line. Where a transaction of $600 cash becomes the worth of a young woman’s life. So that is why I am lending my voice to you and your movement today. Because I actually trust the women I know. I trust them with their choices, I trust them with their bodies and I trust them with their children.

Ruffalo has been politically active before; he’s a vocal opponent of fracking. And while his characterization of the impact of Roe v. Wade as a “law of the land for decades” is slightly historically inaccurate – anti-choice supporters have been chipping away at Roe v. Wade since that Supreme Court ruling came down – his decision to discuss abortion via women who have actually gone through it is a welcome relief from all the men talking about how they know thetruth about the experience.
(via Mark Ruffalo Sends an Awesome Pro-Choice Message in Mississippi)

Because I actually trust the women I know. I trust them with their choices, I trust them with their bodies and I trust them with their children.

bigangry:

vaganto:

According to Stop Patriarchy, Mark Ruffalo sent a speech to be read at an abortion rights rally this weekend in Mississippi in which he expressed his frustration with the state legislature’s ongoing attempts to close every last women’s health centers that offer abortion services.

The Clarion-Ledger reports that over 100 supporters gathered at the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, and listened to a personal account of Ruffalo’s about the issue of abortion rights, in which he mentioned his mother’s struggle to obtain an abortion when she was young:

I am a man. I could say this has nothing to do with me. Except I have two daughters and I have a mother who was forced to illegally have an abortion in her state where abortion was illegal when she was a very young woman. It cost $600 cash. It was a traumatizing thing for her. It was shameful and sleazy and demeaning. When I heard the story I was aghast by the lowliness of a society that would make a woman do that. I could not understand its lack of humanity; today is no different.

Ruffalo reportedly referenced the United States as it existed pre-Roe v. Wade as “relic of an America that was not free nor equal nor very kind”, saying that it “we have worked long and hard to leave behind” that time:

My own mother fought to make herself more than a possession; she lived her life as a mother who chose when she would have children, and a wife who could earn a living if she so chose. I want my daughters to enjoy that same choice. I don’t want to turn back the hands of time to when women shuttled across state lines in the thick of night to resolve an unwanted pregnancy, in a cheap hotel room just south of the state line. Where a transaction of $600 cash becomes the worth of a young woman’s life. So that is why I am lending my voice to you and your movement today. Because I actually trust the women I know. I trust them with their choices, I trust them with their bodies and I trust them with their children.

Ruffalo has been politically active before; he’s a vocal opponent of fracking. And while his characterization of the impact of Roe v. Wade as a “law of the land for decades” is slightly historically inaccurate – anti-choice supporters have been chipping away at Roe v. Wade since that Supreme Court ruling came down – his decision to discuss abortion via women who have actually gone through it is a welcome relief from all the men talking about how they know thetruth about the experience.

(via Mark Ruffalo Sends an Awesome Pro-Choice Message in Mississippi)

Because I actually trust the women I know. I trust them with their choices, I trust them with their bodies and I trust them with their children.

(via floateron)